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Inspiring Stories

Bach to Rock - Music School for People of All Ages

Dr. Albert Kahane and his wife MillieEighty-eight year old Dr. Albert Kahane, one of the first physicians at Kaiser Morse Avenue, and his wife Millie, a nurse educator, are opening a business in Rocklin. “I didn’t think I’d be changing careers after 69 years in healthcare,” said Mrs. Kahane. The couple live at Eskaton Village Carmichael, a continuing care retirement community, where all of their needs are met from dining to socializing, exercising to entertainment and transportation. Dr. Kahane is also a board member of Eskaton Foundation. As a Korean War Veteran and a retired physician, he enjoys being able to offer his expertise and opinion by being on the board. And now at almost 90 years old the Kahanes are opening a new business in Rocklin called Bach to Rock, a music school for all ages. His advice to young entrepreneurs: "Expect the worst." He says, "Opening a business at any age takes guts and there is always a risk."

104 Years Old, In Love with Technology

Carolyn, 104 Years Old, loves technologyCarolyn, 104, loves technology. The iPad is her device of choice. “I had a computer in my apartment before moving to Eskaton.” Six years ago, Carolyn made her home at Eskaton Care Center Fair Oaks. She received an iPad as a gift when she turned 100. Carolyn said it wasn’t hard to learn at all, and if she needs help, she turns to her grandson. "My grandson is in the business, he knows all about these things. If I ever have a problem, he comes over and fixes it."Bob Juniper with The Pleasanton Volunteer Fire Department

Carolyn uses her iPad for Skype, taking and sharing photos, and playing “Words with Friends”. She enjoys reading romance novels on it and is currently enthralled with “All You Need Is Love”.

Carolyn, 104 Years Old, loves technologyShe shared her most recent photograph, a beautiful purple orchid on the shelf in her room. Carolyn explained she just received it as a gift from her Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) Kimberly. Kimberly’s mom and Carolyn both have a love of orchids. "I am appreciative of my CNAs. They are careful and caring. They are really great at their jobs." Carolyn says it feels amazing to be over 100 years old, but she never put much thought into age. And that is her secret to aging. View video.

Veteran, Firefighter Honored for Lifetime of Achievements

Bob Juniper with Lifetime Achievement awardBob Juniper moved to Pleasanton in 1944 and has since dedicated his life to work, family and contributing to his community. On June 11, 2015 at The Parkview Assisted Living Community, where Juniper lives today, Pleasanton Mayor Jerry Thorne, Pleasanton Fire Battalion Chief Joe Testa and a room of family and friends honored Juniper with a Lifetime Achievement award.

Two major accomplishments include his 18 years with the Pleasanton Volunteer Fire Department in the 1950s and 1960s, and his tenure as Bob Juniper with The Pleasanton Volunteer Fire DepartmentPost Commander of the VFW, where he raised funds to build local parks and the Pleasanton Senior Center. “Bob played an integral role in the design and build of the senior center, which opened in 1993 and today serves more than 1,000 seniors per week,” said Pam Deaton, recreations supervisor. Juniper trained Deaton when she joined the center more than 19 years ago.

Mayor Thorne shared the history of the Pleasanton Fire Department and thanked Juniper for his contributions to the community. Chief Testa presented the 92-year-old with the Lifetime Achievement Award. The chief spoke of the vintage photographs displayed on the walls of the fire station when he joined 20 years ago — some of which include snapshots of Juniper himself.

Bob Juniper - US NavyJuniper grew up in Nelsonville, Ohio, and enlisted in the U.S. Navy when World War II broke out. As a pilot, he trained flying tactics and instruments at the flight school in Pensacola, Fla. After 14 years in the military, he decided to move west with his wife.

Only 2,700 people lived in Pleasanton when Juniper first arrived more than 70 years ago. He first worked at a toy factory on Rose Avenue, but eventually took a job at a local grocery store and retired after 30 years.

“Bob led such an interesting life and has always given back to his community,” said Sylvia Zaininger, executive director of The Parkview. “We are so grateful to everyone who attended the award ceremony and a special thanks goes to City of Pleasanton Mayor and Battalion Chief for taking time to honor such an accomplished man.”

Dancing in the Streets

Village Grass Valley residents Albert and Gineete holding a photo when they first met in 1944.Beziers is rich with history, being one of the oldest cities in southern France. Near the Mediterranean, Beziers was occupied by the Germans during WWII. In 1944, as the American troops marched in to liberate France, the citizens came out and danced in the streets. That’s when Ginette met Albert. They were 17 and 19 years old.

A year later, they had a modest wedding. “We were so poor. So for the wedding my father and his father got food from the black market. My grandmother fixed the whole thing. I borrowed a dress,” reminisced Ginette as if telling a story out of a fairytale. After the wedding, they rented a room. But within a few hours, Ginette was sick, so Albert took her home. Her grandmother asked what he had done to her. But it was a case of food poisoning. She sent Albert home to his mother. “What’s wrong, she asked. “She doesn’t want you?”

After 70 years of marriage, Albert and Ginette have endless stories and dozens of photo albums to share. The most interesting story from their seven decades together sounds like a scene from Les Miserables, but with a happy ending.

Albert and Gineete in their younger years.On March 11, 1954, Albert immigrated to Quebec, Canada, leaving behind Ginette and their two sons, ages two and eight. Once he found a job as an airplane mechanic, he sent money for ship passage. When Ginette received the money on August 20, she grabbed her luggage and she and the boys headed to the port, forgetting to let Albert know when she would arrive. He spent days going to each arriving ship from France. “He was so mad,” said Ginette. “But when he saw us, he wasn’t mad anymore.”

They lived in Quebec for four years before boarding a train to the United States. “It was the most beautiful train ride from Quebec to Chicago to Los Angeles,” said Ginette. They could only afford coach seats and the train food was expensive, so they only ate at the stops.

Once settled in California, they worked hard to achieve the American dream. Albert patented inventions and founded his own business, which afforded them a beautiful home on the river in Springville and the ability to travel the world. When asked what makes their relationship so successful, Albert said, “In France, the mayor is the one that marries you. When we say yes, we mean yes. We were so much in love when we got married. When we say we love each other, we love each other.” They say “I love you” multiple times a day, even now after 70 years of marriage. Ginette and Albert live in Eskaton Village Grass Valley, California.

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A Giving Heart

Resident, Simone, knits helmet liners for the Daughters of the Revolution to send soldiers.Simone has a giving heart. Every Christmas the Red Cross delivers a poinsettia to Simone for her kind donations. She knits helmet liners for the Daughters of the Revolution to send soldiers. At six years old, she learned to knit at school in France. “I’ve knitted all my life,” says 100 year old Simone, “If I had all the sweaters I made in my life, I’d have quite a pile.”

Every few weeks her friend takes her to a yarn store in Nevada City to drop off the liners and pick up new yarn. Simone stopped driving at 97, donated her old Toyota to the Eskaton Foundation and moved into Eskaton Village Grass Valley.

She visited other independent living communities before making her selection. “I think it’s the best place locally,” says Simone. She has everything she needs in her lovely apartment. The housekeeper cleans it once a week, she takes the Eskaton transportation to the store, and she enjoys exercise classes every Monday, Wednesday and Friday. When asked what keeps her healthy, she joked about her genes, “I chose my parents very well,” but she’s led a healthy life and wouldn't miss an exercise class for anything.

Simone grew up on the countryside of France and moved to Paris during her teen years before attending college in Ohio. She taught French a couple years in upstate New York, but mostly raised a family and supported her husband who was a doctor in France during WWII. She and her husband Benjamin traveled extensively through Europe and enjoyed living a long and happy life together in Grass Valley, California. We celebrate Simone’s commitment to health and helping others.

Take Betty’s Pillowcase Challenge and Put a Smile on a Child

Betty, resident at Eskaton Kennedy Manor with pillowcase dresses she makes and sends to poverty-stricken children around the world.Eskaton Kennedy Manor resident Betty can make a pillowcase dress in under 19 minutes. She's made over 15,000 dresses that are now worn by children in Kenya, Nigeria, Nairobi, the Philippines and many other poverty-stricken areas around the world -- 41 countries in total. As a Mess Hall Sergeant in the Marines, Betty served 3,200 meals twice a day at Camp Pendleton. It wasn't until 2011 that she learned to sew. Since then she has been making the dresses as fast as she can get her hands on pillowcases. Her label says Island Angel because, she says, an angel is watching over each child who wears one.

After seeing the reaction of a little girl who changed from her rags into a new dress, Betty said, “It’s a joy you could never express, putting the dress on a child. She believed I was an angel.”

In late spring 2014, Betty traded the views of the ocean from the Big Island of Hawaii for the views of the mountains surrounding Willows, California. Now Betty has encouraged many others to take the Pillowcase Challenge. More than 80,000 dresses have been delivered to children in need because Betty inspired them. She modestly says, “I just connect people.” Betty also makes aprons, wheelchair bags and bags for people who use walkers.

The Art of Growing Older

Ruth, 99 displays some of her beautiful artwork.Ruth Duff, 99, illustrates what healthy aging is all about. She walks briskly with a purpose. Ruth is an artist. During the last two years living at Eskaton FoutainWood Lodge she painted more than 150 water colors. Ruth has worked with a variety of media including knitting, silk screening, etching on copper, bronze casting, and print making. She is a true life-long learner.

Over the years her skills were gleaned from the art professors at Portland State University, Sierra College, and University of California Davis.

Ruth uses gardening as a creative outlet. At FountainWood, her garden includes tomatoes, zucchini, and a variety of colorful flowers.

“When I look back, I had a great life,” said Ruth. One of her fondest memories is swimming on the Columbia River at Morgan’s Beach. She raised two children in Portland with her husband Tom before moving to Roseville, California, in 1987. She traveled extensively through Mexico and Europe -- western France and Rome being two of her favorite places.

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A Particular kind of courage - Eskaton veteran is honored by France

Guy Throner in his French Legion Uniform (top photo) and with his gold and scarlet-beribboned medal (below)Eskaton Village Carmichael resident Guy Throner has a wartime bio that reads like a screenplay -- filled with patriotism and heroic acts. Nearly 70 years after the end of World War II, the government of France recently honored him with a medal.

Throner, now 93, was in the first graduating class of the U.S. Navy’s underwater demolition school and was part of an elite unit that later became the Navy SEALS. During WWII, his duties included defusing mines and bombs.

“It was just a job, and we did it. We were so well trained – we didn’t worry about anything. We didn’t think about how dangerous it was,” said Throner.

We salute Mr. Throner for his commitment to saving lives during a time when the fate of the world depended on men of his particular kind of courage.

Exposures: I Care: Crafting warmth for newborns

Marian of Eskaton Village Carmichael knitting baby cap to be donated to newborns at Sutter General and Mercy Hospital.Marian Thompson sits in her armchair, tugging on a spool of yarn. Her needles work in harmony, stitching a baby cap. At 96, her hands ache with arthritis, but she rarely stops to rest.

She knits more baby caps than any member of the Kiddie Kaps knitting group at Eskaton Village Carmichael. Her personal count is 4,226 caps since she joined the Eskaton knitters in 2006. The group has donated over 20,000 baby caps since 2004, bringing comfort to newborns at Sacramento area hospitals.

“A lot of times, I say a little prayer when I’m knitting the cap,” says Thompson. “(I’m) thinking, ‘I hope this cap blesses a baby and keeps its little head warm.’”

Eskaton Athlete Wins Gold

Eskaton Marathoner, Ben and his metalsAmong 11,000 competitors from across the United States and 26 foreign countries, Eskaton Village Carmichael resident Benjamin O’Brien emerged a gold medalist in the Huntsman World Senior Games’ 5 kilometer road race for men ages 95-99. His time was two minutes faster than the previous year, when he also won gold.

Ben is a decorated veteran, state and federal judge, lawyer, husband, father and grandfather and still contributing at the of 96!

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