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News On Aging

Resources on aging from around the world!

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Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow: NCOA Advocates for Older Adults As the Older Americans Act turns 50, NCOA participates in White House Conference on Aging

Fifty years ago, the National Council on Aging (NCOA) played a critical role in the enactment of the Older Americans Act (OAA), helping to establish a national network to support seniors’ desire to live with health and security in their own communities.

Yesterday, NCOA continued that advocacy—for today’s seniors and future generations—by actively participating in the 2015 White House Conference on Aging (WHCOA). Read more.

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AAA helping to end senior hunger

When it comes to eating a healthy diet, millions of Americans 65 and over face a double whammy: Their income is fixed, and their spending on food is consuming a larger portion of their budget.

When it comes to eating a healthy diet, millions of Americans 65 and over face a double whammy: Their income is fixed, and their spending on food is consuming a larger portion of their budget. Read more.

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Pet ownership and its potential benefits for older adults

Research published in Activities, Adaption & Aging calls for increased understanding about older adults, the relationship between pet ownership and health, and the current barriers which limit older adults' chances to own a pet. The study, Fostering the Human-Animal Bond for Older Adults, goes into detail about physical and financial risks for older adult pet ownership and how it can be diminished.

Medical problems that arise with older adults, such as physical illness and emotional issues, have the potential to be mitigated by companionship of pets because it reduces social isolation and enhances physical activity. Read more.

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6 Things Caregivers Must Do While There’s Still Time
Gain peace of mind and prevent future problems by taking steps now

Despite the fact that millions of Americans are facing elder care challenges and struggles, there are not a lot of supportive and informative resources that can prepare families for what to expect.

Getting access to information, demystifying the role of elder care, and learning what is ahead can lighten the load for those just beginning their journey. As a longtime elder law attorney in California and author of The ElderCare Ready Book, I know that families can learn not to fear the elder care role, but just be ready for it. Read more.

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Being a friend can help prevent loneliness

Recently, one of my good friends observed her neighbor sitting quietly on a chair in her front yard. As a woman who is normally milling around her yard tending to her flowers, it was unusual to see her there.

“I’m lonely,” she replied when asked how things were going.

Turns out, one of her dear friends died last week, and the loss left the neighbor questioning the value of her own day-to-day life. Read more.

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What a Sudden Memory Loss Can Really Mean

A husband's story on the need to take alarming symptoms seriously

For most boomers, a memory lapse can be an annoyance. For my wife, Sue, it was a lifesaver.

One late December afternoon, Sue left our New York City apartment for an exercise class. She returned a little over an hour later, unable to remember how she arrived home.

Then things got really strange. Read more.

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What the Medicare Fix Means to You and Your Parents

The new law will raise Medicare premiums, but could improve care

You may have read that President Obama just signed into law a Congressional fix to a Medicare formula that threatens to slash payments to doctors every year. What you may not have seen is how this legislation will affect people 65 and older who are on Medicare. I’ll explain how below.

First, a brief explanation about the Medicare fix. Read more.

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Old age is getting younger

Today’s 75-year-olds are cognitively fitter and happier than the 75-year-olds of 20 years ago

Older adults today show higher levels of cognitive functioning and well-being than older adults of the same age 20 years ago. This has been found in a collaborative study among several research institutions in Berlin, including the Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, the Max Planck Institute for Human Development (MPIB), and the German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP). The result will be published in the scientific journal “Psychology and Aging”.

For all of those who are worrying about getting old, here is some good news... Read more.

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Boomers can save big with these 3 programs

Benefits that will help you afford the life you want.

Every year, millions of Americans enter retirement with the hope that they’ll enjoy a life of quiet leisure thanks to their hard-earned nest eggs. However, as we age, we face new, costly challenges in nearly every facet of life, including health, housing, transportation and even our everyday routines.

Fortunately, the U.S. government has developed or spawned several programs that can let you and your parents afford a life of independence and dignity by receiving specialized financial assistance. Read more.

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Mindfulness Meditation May Help Older Adults Sleep Better

Meditating may help older adults sleep better, a new study suggests.

The study involved about 50 adults in Los Angeles ages 55 and older who had trouble sleeping, including difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep, or who felt sleepy during the day. Participants were randomly assigned to complete either a mindfulness meditation program — in which people learn to better pay attention to what they are feeling physically and mentally from moment to moment — or a sleep education program that taught the participants how to develop better sleep habits. Read more.

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Identifying moderate risk for hospitalization

Spotlight on Seniors

In an interview of 600 seniors aged 65 and older, 33 percent had trips to the hospital and ER caused by falls and other accidents at the home. Problems with eyesight and/or hearing can increase the risk of accidents in the home.

Driving is one of the most sensitive of senior issues. But there’s good news and support for older adults who want to extend their days behind the wheel.

Is your 81-year-old father still in relatively good health and driving? However you are becoming concerned about his safety. You want him to be able to drive as long as possible. How can you tell if he’s still a safe driver? And, are there ways to help improve his driving skills? What’s more, he wants to buy a new car, and you are not sure that is a good idea. Read more.

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Peace Corps Seeking a Few Good Boomers

The Peace Corps and Baby Boomers have something in common: age. The Peace Corp will celebrate its 54thanniversary in March this year. Today, about 7% of the program’s volunteers are 50 or older.

“I’d like it to be closer to 15 percent” said Peace Corps Director Carrie Hessler-Radelet. “The Peace Corps has always been open to volunteers of all ages, but we’ve made a much more purposeful effort to recruit older volunteers.” Four generations of Director Hessler-Radelet’s family have served as volunteers in the Peace Corps. Read more.

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8 Tips for People Who Will Retire in 2015

These strategies will ease your transition into retirement.

Retirement is a major life transition that requires changes to your income and lifestyle. Here are the final preparations you should be making if you plan to retire in 2015. Read more.

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Mind Over Matter: Feeling Younger Linked to Lower Death Rate

A new study finds ‘a strong relationship’ between people's self-perceived age and their cardiovascular health.

It's all in your mind.

Older people who reported feeling younger had a far lower death rate than those who said they felt older, according to a new study by two researchers from University College London. The pair also found “a strong relationship” between a person’s self-perceived age and his or her cardiovascular health: those with worse hearts, in other words, tended to feel older. Read more.

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How to Prepare to Become Your Parents' Caregiver

Gathering this information now will save you trouble and anxiety later

There’s no real training program for family caregivers, but there are things you can do to make it easier when the time comes that you need to step in to help your parents.

November, which is National Family Caregiver Month, is a good time to go through what they are. Read more.

Resources on aging from around the world.

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Your Guide to the New Social Security Statements

Timely advice if one shows up in your mailbox soon

Beginning this month, many workers will get Social Security benefit estimate statements in their mailboxes for the first time since 2011. But to get the most out of them, you need to know how to read them, fix mistakes in them and plot your retirement plans around them.

If you do receive one of these statements from the Social Security Administration, don’t toss it or file it away unread. “It’s probably the most crucial financial planning document for every American. Read more.

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ACIP Recommends Routine PCV13 Immunization for Adults 65 and Older

Group Holds Special Meeting to Discuss, Vote on Pneumococcal Vaccines

The CDC's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) held a special meeting(www.cdc.gov) Aug. 13 to discuss and vote on the use of pneumococcal vaccines in older adults. The meeting concluded with the committee recommending routine immunization with 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) for adults 65 or older. Read more.

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Older People Sleep Less. Now We Know Why.

It's long been known that the older you get, the less you sleep. There are many proposed reasons for why this happens, and they include new medications, psychological distress, retirement or simply the theory that the elderly need less sleep.

But a new study from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and University of Toronto researchers offers, for the first time, a neurological reason for the phenomenon: namely, that a specific cluster of neurons associated with regulating sleep patterns, called the ventrolateral preoptic nucleus, may slowly die off as you get older. Read more.

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Yoga moves for older adults that boost balance and enhance health

The following yoga practices teach proper body alignment and breathing techniques for relaxation.

This breathing technique is one of nature’s best anti-stress medicines. Read more.

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Study suggests hatha yoga boosts brain function in older adults

Practicing hatha yoga three times a week for eight weeks improved sedentary older adults' performance on cognitive tasks that are relevant to everyday life, researchers report. Read more.

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Tapping Into Musical Memory

Why do musical memories linger long after other memories have faded? That question is at the heart of a new documentary, Alive Inside, which looks at the effects of music on people living with Alzheimer’s and other age-related dementias. Read more.

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11 Signs It Might Be Time for Assisted Living

The decision to help an aging adult move out of a current home is a complex one -- both emotionally and practically. Above all, you want the person to be safe and well. How can you all feel more confident about whether circumstances suggest that your loved one should no longer be living alone? Read more.

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Why Being a Grandma May Be Good for the Brain

New research finds a hidden benefit in caring for grandkids

Grandmothering, but not too much grandmothering, may be good for your brain, new research suggests.

Older adults with large social networks and those who report high levels of participation in social activities, such as volunteer work and visiting friends, have sharper brains and keep them that way longer than their peers who are less engaged and less active, Australian scientists wrote recently in the journal Menopause. But, they said, researchers have overlooked caring for grandchildren as a social activity that could help stave off a decline in thinking ability and memory. Read more.

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Teens Get Together With Senior Citizens For An Incredibly Hilarious Internet Lesson

Explaining the Internet to people who have never used it before can be tricky business, but for one group of teens, they're up for the challenge.

In the touching -- and at times hilarious -- documentary trailer for "Cyber-Seniors," senior citizens are featured getting their first glimpse of the World Wide Web with the help of some experts.

Inspired by their grandparents' technology transformation after learning about Skype and Facebook, sisters Macaulee and Kascha Cassaday wanted to help close the generational gap by teaching other seniors about the Internet through a teen mentoring program.

"Yes, I've heard of [YouTube] but I have no clue what it means," says one senior to her teen mentor. View video.

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Why older couples are living together, skipping marriage

Every "decade" birthday is big, but turning 60 somehow feels... bigger. Checking off these goals will make the transition feel a whole lot smoother.

Many baby boomers already know a thing or two about marriage and are choosing not to tie the knot on their relationships — often because of money.

Census Bureau data show adults older than 50 are among the fastest growing segment of unmarried couples in the U.S.

Financial advisers say concerns about debt, benefits, taxes and cash flow are often the primary reasons they decide not to walk down the aisle.

"The biggest considerations couples have in deciding whether or not to remarry ... Read more.

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10 Things Everyone Should Do Before Turning 60

Every "decade" birthday is big, but turning 60 somehow feels... bigger. Checking off these goals will make the transition feel a whole lot smoother.

What is it about turning 60 that’s feels so different from all other ages? "It’s a time of major transition," says Damon Raskin, M.D., a gerontologist and anti-aging specialist. ”It’s a time when things often start falling apart, both physically and emotionally.” But, there’s also good news. If you use your 50s to prepare for the big 6-0, you’ll make the transition much more easily. Better news, if you’re already over 60, embracing these activities will only make your life better. Granted, it’ll take some effort on your part, but the pay-off will be huge.

Read on for 10 things that should be on your bucket list. Read more.

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Socializing Can Adds Years to Your Life

Having friends doesn't just help with loneliness. It may also improve your health. See how staying in touch might add years to your life.

Just like a balanced diet and exercise, an active social life is an important part of healthy living. Studies show that people who have good social networks may live longer — and better. So, how socially connected you are now may help determine how healthy and independent you will be in the future. Read more.

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Here’s What Needs to be on Every Boomers’ Retirement Check List

The economy might be on the mend, but that doesn’t mean baby boomers’ security in being able to retire is also on the mend.

Earlier this month, the Insured Retirement Institute (IRI) released its fourth annual report on the retirement preparedness of boomers, called “Boomer Expectations for Retirement 2014.” The report shows only 35%of boomers says they’re confident in their efforts to prepare financially for retirement, a drop from the 44% who felt that way in 2011.
Read more.

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The Most Therapeutic Yoga for Boomers

Iyengar makes it possible for people with a variety of ailments to practice and heal.

Katherine Beattie was skeptical about her first Iyengar yoga class two years ago. She wondered how she would ever get into the positions. A hip replacement, knee surgery and osteoarthritis in her hands and wrists left her with chronic pain and discomfort.

"I had never experienced anything like it before," says Beattie, 66, director of a Los Angeles program for at-risk teens. "I never knew yoga could be like that. The props made all the difference." Read more.

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7 Easy Ways to Build Strong Bones

Jump 10 times, crush some cans and other tips to boost bone density.

Bone building reaches a peak during adolescence but then slows after age 25. In addition to this natural bone loss, we’re less likely to perform high-impact, bone-stimulating exercises (such as jumping) after age 50. This adds up to an increased risk of osteoporosis and bone breaks and fractures.

Fortunately, you can build stronger bones at any age. Read more.

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Baby boomers: Have you had your colon tested recently?

March is Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month, and a good time to learn more about colorectal cancer – cancer of the colon and rectum – and how it can be prevented or treated.

Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States among men and women. This year, about 140,000 new cases of colorectal cancer will be diagnosed, and 56,000 people will die from the disease. Read More

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6 Aging Myths We Need to Stop Believing

Contrary to popular belief, getting older is not synonymous with declining health.

You've probably heard a thousand times that as you age, your body and mind begin to "go" — you can no longer move the way you used to and your health deteriorates. But those "facts" couldn't be further from the truth. Aging doesn't have to mean decline, in fact, just the opposite. Below are six myths and why each is not true. Read more.

MarketWatch logo5 best money strategies for boomers

The beginning of a new year prompts many of us to start thinking about a personal-finance tuneup, but if you’re 50 or older — a time when those vague retirement dreams are starting to coalesce into a hoped-for reality — it’s crucial to take time to assess your finances. Read More

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6 Symptoms Mistakenly Blamed on Aging

How many times have you ignored achy joints or feelings of fatigue, assuming it's all part of getting older? If you're like most people in midlife, probably too often. But sometimes symptoms we pass off as age-related may actually be signs of something more, something that could be addressed with treatment. Read more.

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How You Can Make Your Brain Smarter Every Day

"Smarter Brains," which reports on the latest research and discoveries in neuroscience and how we can apply them to our daily lives to boost our brain power at any age. Read more.

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How Technology Will Support an Aging America

The digital technology revolution is intersecting with the realities of an aging society. It's not clear yet which, if any, products or services will emerge as "killer apps" for seniors, their families and their caregivers. But at least some of the flood of tech products, software and related apps are moving toward commercial development, and outlines of an industry are taking shape.

One powerful focal point of these developments is "aging in place". Read more.

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What Do We 'Owe' Our Parents?

A new survey looks at the way we feel about our role in our parents' lives as they age. Read more.