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News On Aging

Resources on aging from around the world!

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States with Fastest-Growing Senior Populations

As the number of aging baby boomers increases drastically in the coming years, where these older adults choose to live will no doubt impact the senior living industry.

The population 65 and over increased from 36.6 million in 2005 to 47.8 million in 2015 and is projected to more than double to 98 million in 2060, according to a recent report from the Administration for Community Living.

States that saw the largest increase in adults 65 and older from 2005 to 2015 include Arizona with a 48% increase, Colorado with a 53.8% hike, Georgia with 50.2%, South Carolina with 48.9% and Nevada with 55.3%, according to the report.

The two states that had the most residents 65 and older in 2015 were California and Florida with 5,188,754 and 3,942,468 respectively. Read more.

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New Nursing Home Rules Offer Residents More Control Of Their Care

About 1.4 million residents of nursing homes across the country now can be more involved in their care under the most wide-ranging revision of federal rules for such facilities in 25 years.

The changes reflect a shift toward more “person-centered care,” including requirements for speedy care plans, more flexibility and variety in meals and snacks, greater review of a person’s drug regimen, better security, improved grievance procedures and scrutiny of involuntary discharges. Read more.

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Taking A Nap For An Hour After Lunch May Boost Brain Power In Older Adults

As people age, one of the most important things to do is preserve memory and the ability to think clearly. Now, scientists found a new way to boost brain power among older adults - taking an hour nap after lunch.

Though the researchers found that a longer or shorter nap did not produce the same results, the study shows that sleep plays a vital role in helping older adults maintain their healthy mental function. Read more.

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Assisted Living Tax Deductions

Assisted living is expensive. Families that know a loved one needs assisted living care typically struggle to make the numbers work. When you’re in the position of figuring out how to pay for an assisted living facility for yourself or a loved one, every little bit counts.

And you may be able to get a little bit of a break come tax time. Read more.

Medical News Today logo

Could loneliness be a sign of Alzheimer's?

Previous research has suggested loneliness may be associated with Alzheimer's disease among older adults. A new study supports this link, after identifying a marker of early Alzheimer's in the brains of seniors with greater self-reported loneliness

Study co-author Nancy J. Donovan, of Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School in Boston, MA, and colleagues report their findings in JAMA Psychiatry.

According to a 2010 survey from the American Association of Retired Persons (AARP), around 32 percent of adults aged 60-69 and 25 percent of adults aged 70 and older in the United States report feeling lonely. Read more.

Medical Xpress logo

Senior adults can see health benefits from dog ownership

Rebecca Johnson and her team determined that older adults who also are pet owners benefit from the bonds they form with their canine companions. Credit: Sinclair School of Nursing.

"Our study explored the associations between dog ownership and pet bonding with walking behavior and health outcomes in older adults," said Rebecca Johnson, a professor at the MU College of Veterinary Medicine, and the Millsap Professor of Gerontological Nursing in the Sinclair School of Nursing. "This study provides evidence for the association between dog walking and physical health using a large, nationally representative sample." Read more.

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When Should You ‘Talk’ Differently to Someone with Dementia?
As the disease changes, so should your method of communication

If you are caring for someone with Alzheimer’s disease or another form of dementia, you will notice that as the condition worsens, so does your loved one’s ability to initiate or participate in conversations; understand and process information; and communicate wishes, wants and needs.

Behavior changes, such as forgetfulness and confusion, mood swings, frustration or anger are red flags that they have reached the “moderate” stage of dementia. Read more.

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11 Signs It Might Be Time for Assisted Living

The decision to help an aging adult move out of a current home is a complex one -- both emotionally and practically. Above all, you want the person to be safe and well. How can you all feel more confident about whether circumstances suggest that your loved one should no longer be living alone? Read more.

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Socializing Can Adds Years to Your Life

Having friends doesn't just help with loneliness. It may also improve your health. See how staying in touch might add years to your life.

Just like a balanced diet and exercise, an active social life is an important part of healthy living. Studies show that people who have good social networks may live longer — and better. So, how socially connected you are now may help determine how healthy and independent you will be in the future. Read more.

MarketWatch logo5 best money strategies for boomers

The beginning of a new year prompts many of us to start thinking about a personal-finance tuneup, but if you’re 50 or older — a time when those vague retirement dreams are starting to coalesce into a hoped-for reality — it’s crucial to take time to assess your finances. ReaNextAvenue logod More.

6 Symptoms Mistakenly Blamed on Aging

How many times have you ignored achy joints or feelings of fatigue, assuming it's all part of getting older? If you're like most people in midlife, probably too often. But sometimes symptoms we pass off as age-related may actually be signs of something more, something that could be addressed with treatment. Read more.

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